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Words to remember: Canadian newsmakers have their say on COVID-19

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A look at some of the top quotes from across Canada on Tuesday in relation to COVID-19:

“In New Brunswick, a kid, one small hand-coloured words of encouragement in crayon. These words posted in the window for social distancing walkers to see and it says ‘we all have to do hard things.’ I am your earworm, your broken record. It’s important to reinforce these recommendations.”

— Dr. Theresa Tam, Canada’s chief medical health officer.

“I never thought in my whole life I’d see the day where I’d say we can’t have the public celebration of the Eucharist for a time. It’s a very difficult time with the virus. We’re going through the valley of tears.”

— Cardinal Thomas Collins.

“The duration of this crisis will be determined by the choices we make right now. Do your part: Stay home.”

— Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

“Hearing everything is on the table, but not having any more meat on the table is wearing thin with the business community that is absolutely freaking out.”

— Dan Kelly, president of the Canadian Federation of Independent Business.

“We are at a pivotal moment right here and right now … Where we go from here, what happens next depends on you. To those of you who believe the choice to ignore public health recommendations will not make a difference, this is not accurate and this is not acceptable.”

— Dr. Eileen de Villa, Toronto’s medical officer of health.

“The goal here is to get education out there, but if we do encounter somebody who is blatantly ignoring what they are being asked to do, enforcement may certainly be an option.”

— RCMP spokeswoman Cpl. Jennifer Clarke.

“We need to do everything possible to slow the spread of COVID-19. As a society, we’re being asked to make tremendous individual sacrifices. To get through this, we must all make sacrifices. We must put our collective well-being above all else.”

— Ontario Premier Doug Ford.

“Only air hugs, waves, winks or kisses in the air. It’s a little bit scary, but we don’t have any other option.”

— Giovanna Loureiro on her upcoming wedding being moved to a Toronto photography studio with just immediate family.

“What we’re seeing here today is a result of people going in a public setting and spreading COVID-19. You are threatening the lives of loved ones and your own life.”

— Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Dwight Ball.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published March 24, 2020.

© Copyright Tri-City News



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Education over enforcement: What to expect under new physical distancing rules

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The first weekend under new physical distancing rules saw both residents and law enforcement figuring out how to adapt to the new normal.

On Friday, Premier Blaine Higgs announced the province would be cracking down on violations of the physical distancing order.

Staying two metres away from another person is mandatory, except in the case of members of the same household, and in some cases at work. 

People found breaking the two-metre distance rule, or gathering in large groups can now be charged and fined between $292 and $10,200.

Keith Gagnon of Caraquet found out about the new enforcement rules the hard way. 

On Saturday, he was handed a ticket for $292 for driving with a friend he doesn’t live with. The two were on their way to get a car wash.

Keith Gagnon plans on contesting a $292 ticket for breaking the physical distancing order, because he says he didn’t know the rules had changed. (Submitted by Keith Gagnon.)

Gagnon said he plans on contesting the ticket, since he doesn’t feel it was fair for the officer to fine him without giving him a warning first. 

“I was just finishing a night shift and never knew about that law,” said Gagnon in an email to the CBC.

Despite the incident this past weekend, Gagnon said he is taking the outbreak seriously, and has been practising physical distancing as best as he can. 

“I never left my home,” he said. “I don’t want my family to get this disease.”

Education first

New Brunswick RCMP spokesperson Const. Hans Ouellette couldn’t give any specifics about new ticketing practices but said it’s something officers across the province are taking seriously.

“We’re asking people to do what New Brunswickers do so well, which is we look out for one another. So our primary focus still remains working with the communities to do everything that we can to reduce the spread of COVID-19.”

Ouellette wouldn’t give details of what officers might be on the lookout for, as each case is different, but said they are basing their response on advice from Public Health.

“That may include tickets or other enforcement actions for people who are not following the directive aimed at keeping everyone safe,” he said.

RCMP are urged to educate people about new physical distancing rules before handing out tickets and fines. (CBC News)

He added that ticketing is at the discretion of each officer, but not adhering to a self-isolation order after entering the province or being within two metres of someone you don’t live with are things that could potentially bring fines.

Ouellette said the officers’ first reflex should be to educate rule-breakers. 

“Are you going to see police officers out there with yardsticks measuring how far apart everyone is? Probably not. … Are we going to be stopping every car we see with more than two people in it? No.

“Our main goal out of all of this, before the enforcement action comes into play, is to have that collaborative work, that educational piece to really be able to help people make the right decisions.”

A runner and walker keep their distance from each other on the Charlottetown boardwalk. (Brian McInnis/CBC)

No numbers for tickets or fines issued have been released by the RCMP or the province.

The Saint John Police Force said no tickets have been issued under the compliance order so far.

“The SJPF is encouraging and promoting compliance,” said spokesperson Jim Hennessy in an email.

Other local police forces have yet to provide comments.

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Ottawa is handing out $2,000 cheques to out-of-work Canadians. Could a basic income be next?

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Peter Martin doesn’t get it.

Workers who have suddenly lost their livelihoods due to the COVID-19 crisis will soon be receiving $2,000 a month from Ottawa to keep them afloat.

And yet Martin, 59, a former constitutional lawyer who lost everything about a decade ago after a mental breakdown, struggles to survive on just $1,169 a month from the Ontario Disability Support Program (ODSP), the province’s welfare program for the disabled.

“It’s a very frustrating situation,” he said this week from his Junction-area apartment where he is self-isolating with his black cat.

“They are getting $2,000 when they have a house to live in and supports and sometimes savings — as opposed to people like us who live cheque to cheque,” he said.

Martin and other Canadians on social assistance live between 40 and 60 per cent below the poverty line and are forced to rely on community supports such as drop-in meal programs and food banks to survive.

As physical-distancing orders push many of those programs to close, Ontario is pumping $200 million into social service agencies to fill the gap.

But Martin wonders why there is a federal plan for workers that pays $2,000 a month and no financial help for people like him.

“They are giving money to agencies to provide food to people who come out of isolation to get it,” he said. “Why not just give the money to us so we can buy our own groceries?”

It is a question supporters of a basic income were asking long before the coronavirus struck China earlier this year and exploded into a global health crisis. And it is a demand they have since amplified through an online petition signed by more than 30,000 calling for an emergency basic income to help Canadians weather the storm.

Ottawa responded March 26 with the Canada Emergency Relief Benefit (CERB), a monthly payment of $2,000 for four months that will go to any worker who earned at least $5,000 in the past 12 months and has lost their job as a result of the pandemic.

“It’s not the unconditional basic income that Canadians across the country asked for when they signed our petition,” acknowledged Toronto businessman Floyd Marinescu, founder of UBI Works Canada, which launched the petition March 16. “But it’s a signal that our leaders recognize the value of a basic income as an economic recovery measure.

“This emergency basic income will open the door for our government to learn about the benefits of a UBI as an economic stimulus that will benefit all Canadians — and act to make it reality,” he said in a statement on the campaign’s Facebook page.

The reason unemployed workers are being treated so much better in this crisis than people on social assistance is that middle-income voters swing elections and society’s most vulnerable often don’t vote, Marinescu said in an interview.

And that is why this is a historic opportunity.

“As many as four million Canadians are going to be applying for the CERB and will see just how precarious their own situation is. With that real, lived experience, we can rally the centre to implement a basic income for everyone,” he said.

Businesses automate to survive when times are tough, and this global crisis will see even more jobs lost to automation, Marinescu added.

He predicts more than two million Canadians who will receive a temporary basic income through the CERB may not have jobs to come back to when it runs out.

“Now is the time to push for a UBI so this next recession can be shorter and we can all come out better off,” he said.

Former Tory senator Hugh Segal couldn’t agree more.

He helped design Ontario’s ill-fated basic income pilot project, introduced in 2017 by Kathleen Wynne’s Liberal government in 2017 and scrapped by Doug Ford’s Progressive Conservatives when they swept to power in June 2018.

Because the experiment ended prematurely, the province — and researchers watching around the world — were not able to determine if sending unconditional cash payments to low-income residents improved their health, education, housing and employment prospects.

But informal surveys of those who participated showed promise. A majority who had low-wage jobs before the trial remained in the workforce. Many went back to school, and mental health improved dramatically.

Segal’s model was similar to the Guaranteed Income Supplement for seniors that kicks in when incomes drop below a certain level.

It brought incomes for working-age adults up to about 75 per cent of the provincial poverty line, or about $1,400 a month. Individuals with disabilities got a monthly top-up of $500. It was a stark difference compared to Ontario’s current monthly social assistance benefits of $733 for people deemed able to work and $1,169 for those with disabilities.

And unlike social assistance, Segal argues his basic income model encouraged people to work because those with annual incomes of up to $34,000 — or about $12,000 above the poverty line — would still receive some support.

On social assistance, onerous monthly reporting requirements allow people to keep just $200 in earnings a month before clawbacks. It means someone on Ontario Works (OW) deemed employable can earn only $1,666 a month — or just under $20,000 a year — before they get kicked off.

Compared to the $100-billion-plus COVID-19 federal relief package, the Parliamentary Budget Office in 2018 estimated it would cost Ottawa just $43 billion in new funding to provide a national, guaranteed minimum income, similar to the one Ontario was testing. And it would support about 7.5 million working-age Canadians.

Segal, the Matthews Fellow in Global Public Policy at Queen’s University, says the global pandemic highlights the vulnerability of precarious workers and people with disabilities struggling to survive on social assistance.

“Once the pandemic is under control and people can relax a bit, the public and policy-makers will be taking a hard took at what went wrong and what we could do better,” he said in an interview.

“And one area for reform is the lack of agility our existing social cash-transfer systems have with respect to getting money to low-income people quickly when necessary,” he said.

Polling shows close to 70 per cent of Canadians support basic income, Segal noted.

“We already have a basic income for children through the Canada Child Benefit and the Guaranteed Income Supplement for seniors and a tiny bit of help for low-income people through the GST tax credit,” he said.

“It’s not really the world’s largest construction job to put those things together and find a way to do this through a basic income guarantee for all … It’s just a question of political will.”

Public sector unions and those who worry about the collapse of social programs will oppose it, he predicted, as will those who argue paying people to do nothing will cause them to abandon the labour force.

But basic income is about more efficient cash transfers to people, not about cutting services, Segal said. And 70 per cent of people living in poverty have a job, he noted. Often more than one. A basic income could supplement that low-wage work and lift them out of poverty, he said.

The other roadblock will be government finance officials who would see such a large, annual expenditure as a limit on their ability to design and craft new initiatives, Segal said.

“Those three groups of opponents are going to be just as dug in after (the pandemic) as they are now,” he predicted.

Adding to the challenge, will be the call for fiscal restraint to bring down a deficit that will likely top $200 billion due to the crisis.

But in a minority government anything can happen, Segal said, suggesting the NDP and others could make basic income a condition of support.

“I remain really optimistic,” he said. “But I think we have to be realistic about the constraints that we’re going to have to face.”

University of Manitoba economist Evelyn Forget’s research on Manitoba’s minimum basic income experiment in the late 1970s has been a major force behind renewed interest in the concept. One of her promising findings from the rural town of Dauphin, where most low-income families received the benefit, was a drop in hospital admissions and an increase in high school graduations.

Basic income is always discussed during times of economic collapse, most recently during the global financial crisis of 2007-2008, she noted.

But once the economy recovers, the idea falls by the wayside.

“One of the things we are seeing now is how limited existing programs are, and how hard it is to make them work together to make sure nobody falls through the gaps,” she said in an interview from Winnipeg.

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“It’s because we don’t have a basic income. That’s going to be hard for people to ignore going forward,” she predicted. “The limitations of those programs are becoming very, very apparent.”

Basic income could gain more acceptance after the pandemic if today’s economic measures to support business and ordinary Canadians are successful — and remain popular with the public, she predicted.

“But we are at a point where things could go in either direction,” she said.

If the government’s action is shown to be excessive or wasteful, the idea of more broader basic-income-type measures could fizzle.

“One hopes basic income doesn’t have to wear any mistakes they might make,” she added.

Economist Armine Yalnizyan, however, says a basic income for everyone is the last thing Canada needs when the crisis is over.

“Basic income helps people make the choice of not going to work,” said Yalnizyan, the Atkinson Charitable Foundation’s fellow on the future of workers.

“And when this is over, we are going to need all hands on deck. We can already anticipate labour shortages in the essential services and non-profit sector, in health care, child care, first responders — work that robots can’t do.”

For Yalnizyan and labour activists, basic services — child care, pharmacare, dental and vision care and more affordable, reliable public transit — are a better bet for the same public investment.

Building a robust system of basic services for everyone will grow the middle class and allow its members to spend money on more discretionary items, she argued.

With an aging society, Canada will need its working-age population to have enough discretionary income to keep the economy growing, she added.

“Yes, we have to focus on the most vulnerable. Yes, we have to stabilize the economy from the bottom up. Yes, we have to fill in the cracks in the floor so the whole building doesn’t collapse,” she said, noting governments are scrambling to do that now in the eye of the pandemic.

“But when we get through to the other side … we have to also set our sights on making sure those who are able to work, and can work full-time, are working. And that their work is valued.”

Increasing incomes — valuing the caring work that this crisis has highlighted — is a better economic strategy than giving people basic incomes to bolster lousy pay, she argued.

Toronto social policy expert John Stapleton is also a skeptic who says a basic income for every Canadian from cradle to grave would “never fly,” particularly with seniors who would oppose any attempt to tinker with their hard-earned benefits.

But the former provincial social services bureaucrat says the pandemic may provide an opening for a less overbearing and dehumanizing welfare system.

The ministry’s move in March to suspend monthly income reporting for people on social assistance during the crisis — largely due to the need for physical distancing — brings the program one step closer to a basic-income-type delivery model, Stapleton said.

“It could be the beginning of streamlining the system and making it less onerous on people and (case) workers,” he said. “It’s kind of like basic income through the back door.”

Yalniyzan agrees that COVID-19 may force governments to rethink support to the most vulnerable working-age adults, those who are too ill to work or who can’t work full-time. And a federal program, based on a basic income, may be the way to go.

“Through this experience, more eyes have been opened to the reality facing a lot of our neighbours,” she said. “And we have seen in real time our ability to respond together when we view ourselves as in it together.”

The question is whether that sense of solidarity will last.

Peter Martin certainly hopes so.

In ordinary times, Martin pays $740 of his $1,169 monthly ODSP cheque on rent and about $300 on medical marijuana to control his severe PTSD. The remaining $129 goes toward transportation to the Parkdale Activity Recreation Centre (PARC) for meals and socialization and where he earns $30 a week as a peer support worker.

But to keep staff and community members safe, PARC has suspended all peer support work and is limiting drop-in meals to people who are homeless.

Martin is paying a friend to buy him groceries out of the money he usually spends on TTC fare while he self-isolates due to an underlying health condition that makes him vulnerable to the virus.

“There are an awful lot of people on ODSP right now who are really, really scared,” he said. “We’re talking about not paying our rent because we need to buy food.”

Martin admires the heroism of health-care workers and others on the front lines helping the sick and vulnerable. And he is buoyed by the collective concern of Canadians “pulling together” to get through the crisis.

“But for people like us, this is not a crisis,” he said. “It is just another crisis.

“I just hope people remember us when this is over.”

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B.C. bylaw officers keeping a watch on physical distancing – Mission City Record

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The message appears to have been received — officers in charge of keeping an eye on physical distancing say British Columbians are steering clear of each other.

An order by Mike Farnworth, Minister of Public Safety and Solicitor General, on March 26 gave municipal bylaw officers the power to act on gatherings of more than 50 people in public spaces or on private businesses such as restaurants that contravened provincial health orders meant to contain the spread of COVID-19.

Black Press Media examined municipalities across B.C. to see how Farnworth’s orders have been followed. Enforcement, it turns out, is often unnecessary and not as effective as a kind reminder to keep two metres apart.

Surrey

Cpl. Elenore Sturko, an RCMP media officer in Surrey, is part of a joint team that was organized by police and city bylaw officers following Farnworth’s announcement.

As of Thursday, officers had issued just nine warnings to 202 businesses that had been visited and also found parks including the popular Crescent Beach were usually quiet.

Sturko said officers have found a willingness in Surrey’s residents to do the right thing. The businesses that required a warning, she added, were not trying to flout the rules.

“We’re not seeing a lot of people willfully or purposefully putting people at risk,” she said.

Vancouver

Generally cities, and not police departments, are in charge of bylaw officers, and have been taking the lead on Farnworth’s order. Vancouver’s municipal police, for example, are not issuing tickets or taking calls about distancing.

A City of Vancouver spokesperson told Black Press its bylaw officers made 9,295 restaurant inspections and also checked on 2,658 personal care facilities. Only one restaurant, a Tim Hortons, had its business licence suspended and was forced to close for three days.

The Vancouver Park Board, meanwhile, has jurisdiction over the city’s 230-plus parks. Park board spokesperson Christine Ulmer said over 5,000 signs reminding residents to keep their space have been placed, parking lots have been closed to discourage traffic, and park rangers have been deployed to the city’s popular destinations like Kitsilano Beach and Stanley Park.

“They have found people are really responsive, really acceptive, a little sheepish and apologetic when they realize they are too close,” said Ulmer. “It’s been really positively received, which is really helpful.”

Those rangers also have the ability to issue their own fines, but haven’t yet.

“It’s not in the direction we want to go,” said Ulmer. “It’s difficult financial times for a lot of people. I think slapping heavy penalties is probably a last resort.”

Not every city has the resources Vancouver has.

Victoria

Victoria Mayor Lisa Helps said during a press conference Monday that her city doesn’t have bylaw officers to spare. She hoped Emergency Management B.C., which co-ordinates provincial disaster planning, would help with additional resources.

“Just follow the rules because not doing so is really costly, not only to public health but it’s really costly from a bottom line point of view,” said Helps. “We don’t want to hire more bylaw officers, we don’t want to spend more taxpayer dollars on bylaw.”

It appears police have stepped in over the last few weeks, at one point breaking up a party of young people who had gathered.

In an email to Black Press, a spokesperson for Emergency Management B.C. said compliance staff from other ministries, such as liquor and cannabis control officers, would be redeployed to support municipalities.

A joint organization by the Ministries of Public Safety, Attorney General, Municipal Affairs and Emergency Management B.C. has also been set up to support enforcement of the public health orders.

“This unified command structure will work to provide guidance to bylaw and compliance officers and look into potential issues around resources and cross-government communication,” said the spokesperson.

Not every city has seen a need for more bylaw officers.

Whistler

In Whistler, for example, a spokesperson said officers are active, but there have been few reported cases of non-compliance. That message was the same across the province in Cranbrook, according to the city’s manager of building and bylaw services Tony Luce.

“Given the low volume of complaint driven calls that we have received at least to date, we like to think the messaging from our PHO [Provincial Health Officer] is getting recognized in our community,” said Luce in an email.

Penticton

In Penticton, bylaw officers received only 11 complaints between March 25 to 30, including another about a person who wasn’t self-isolating, according to bylaw services supervisor Tina Siebert.

While bylaw officers can enforce the provincial health order, they can’t actually issue fines. In practice this means officers report back to health authorities, who then decide on penalties. Kelowna, for example, announced its own bylaw enforcement measures Friday, but stipulated Interior Health would be in charge of financial penalties.

Nelson

In Nelson, where the municipal police department administrates and supervises bylaw officers, Chief Paul Burkart said he’s advised staff that education is the goal with physical distancing. Enforcement, he added, is more about reminding residents of the rules and, if necessary, following up with the health authority.

“We’re not out there with a tape measure, because that’s not enforceable as far as we’re concerned,” he said.

And in B.C., that mostly hasn’t been necessary.

Education, not enforcement

Sturko said she hopes the public understands bylaw officers are working in good faith when they approach people on the street, in parks and in businesses.

“The bottom line is that this exercise and these functions that we’re doing are really not meant to be about punishing. What it’s meant to do is bring people into compliance,” she said.

“What we want to do is educate people, let them know what the deficiencies are, and hopefully achieve the goal which is to make sure people are doing things which have been ordered in order to help us all stay safe and healthy.”

As for the federal Quarantine Act, which the federal government has activated to enforce a mandatory 14-day self-isolation for anyone returning to Canada from oversease, while by-law may receive calls from concerned citizens over neighbours disobeying this law they cannot issue tickets.

Instead, federal officials are working with law enforcement to develop a strategy in how to ensure compliance and punish those who don’t listen with penalties and fines.



tyler.harper@nelsonstar.com

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