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Tech makes cuts to address $18M shortfall | News, Sports, Jobs

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HOUGHTON — Michigan Technological University’s Board of Trustees approved a balanced budget with $18 million in cuts to the general and auxiliary budgets during a remote meeting Monday. 

The budget includes a decrease in non-payroll spending and a six-month pay reduction for employees earning over $60,000 a year. Fifty-six open staff positions and 31 filled staff positions are being eliminated, which President Rick Koubek said was done as a last resort.

Realigning our expenses while preserving the academic excellence of our programs was crucial,” he said during Monday’s meeting. “And I’m thankful to everyone who addressed a difficult financial situation with so much creativity and resolve.”

The administration also requested the ability to be flexible in spending to maintain a balanced budget to reflect any changes in state appropriations or a tuition cap. 

Budget projections include revenue losses from tuition, room and board, state appropriations and other areas, said Trustee Jeffrey Littman, who was named the board’s vice-chair for the coming year later in the meeting. Assumptions included the start of in-person instruction in September and standard housing and dining revenues based on a moderate drop and enrollment. The drop in state funding is also expected to be moderate, Littman said. 

The institutional portion of money given to Tech from the federal CARES Act will be used to offset expenses related to instructional costs and expected additional expenses to maintain social distancing and other safety protocols. 

The board also approved tuition increases of 3% for Michigan residents and 3.8% on average for non-residents. Koubek said the increase was to adust for inflation or order to maintain the quality of academic programs.

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Lyon take Ligue 1 appeal to Council of State, Sports News

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Lyon will challenge the decision to end the Ligue 1 season early because of the coronavirus pandemic before the Council of State, France’s highest administrative court, a club source told AFP on Monday.

The club criticised the April 30 ruling made by the French league (LFP) to declare the season over following an announcement by the government that football could not restart because of the health crisis.

Lyon president Jean-Michel Aulas also wrote a letter Monday to France’s prime minister and sports minister urging them to reconsider the decision, with the government expected to announce next week a further loosening of the lockdown.

“Could we imagine that 2 June is also a great opportunity to rectify the mistake concerning French football and to allow, with a health protocol used everywhere, a gradual resumption of training and, why not, a resumption of the 2019-20 season over the months of July or August?” Aulas said.

Lyon, who have reached this season’s Champions League last 16, were left seventh in the standings and outside the European qualification places when the season was halted.

An administrative court in Paris has already rejected an appeal from the club.

The judge of the Paris administrative court “has logically retained… that the decisions taken by the league’s board of directors on April 30 could only be challenged before the Council of State,” the LFP said in a statement on Friday.

Lyon took objection to the LFP expressing satisfaction at the decision, replying via a statement of their own that “the administrative tribunal did not rule on the merits of the case”.

“It in no way changes the nature and the basis of the action brought” by the club, Lyon said, warning they would take the matter to the Council of State on Monday.

Amiens, who are contesting their relegation to Ligue 2 and whose initial appeal was also turned down last week by the Paris court, indicated their plans to turn to the Council of State as well.

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What to know and expect with the NHL moving toward Phase 2 of its return-to-play plan

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The NHL season has remained on pause since March due to the coronavirus but there has been significant movement on a return-to-play plan for the league over the past several days. After the league and players officially agreed on a proposal outlining a league restart last week, the NHL announced Monday that it plans on entering Phase 2 of its plan in early June. 

So, what is Phase 2 and what does it mean moving forward? Let’s answer some questions you may have.

What does Phase 2 entail?

Under the league’s established safety protocols, Phase 2 of the NHL return-to-play plan allows players to return to team facilities for small group workouts. A maximum of six players are allowed to participate in on-ice workouts at one time, though all drills must be non-contact and no coaches or team personnel are allowed on the ice. Players can also use team weight rooms and exercise/rehab spaces. Additional safety measures include a mandate on wearing masks when not actively exercising inside the facilities, plus social distancing of six feet when players aren’t on the ice. 

This phase is optional, so it’s up to individual players if they want to participate in these group workouts. Teams aren’t allowed to require players to return to the club’s home city, and facilities can only reopen in areas where local guidelines allow for it. If a player is isolating in an opposing club’s home city, they can use that team’s facilities if permitted. The league is requiring traveling players to abide by local government mandates, such as Canada’s mandatory 14-day isolation period for people arriving from abroad.

What about testing?

All players and staff will be tested 48 hours prior to returning to team facilities, and those test results will come back within 24 hours. Nobody will be permitted to enter the team facilities until they have a confirmed negative test. Additionally, the league is recommending that teams continue to test players at least twice weekly throughout Phase 2, if there are enough tests available without depriving local resources.

If there are not enough tests available in an area, teams will require players to isolate for a 14-day period before they’re permitted to enter the facility. All players and staff will also have to perform daily temperature and symptom checks at home before arriving to the facilities.

When will Phase 2 go into effect?

A specific date hasn’t been announced yet but the league hopes to enter the stage in early June.

“It has not yet been determined when precisely Phase 2 will start or how long it may last,” the NHL said in the memo. “We are continuing to monitor developments in each of the Club’s markets, and may adjust the overall timing if appropriate, following discussion with all relevant parties.”

What does this mean for the NHL’s return-to-play plans?

While Phase 2 may not seem like the biggest or sexiest news since teams won’t be able to fully return to practice, it’s a significant and necessary step toward a return. Many players haven’t been able to skate since early March when the league went into shutdown, so just being able to get back on the ice and work out is an important development.

What is Phase 3?

Phase 3 of the NHL’s return-to-play plan is expected to consist of a training camp that precedes the league’s official restart. NHL commissioner Gary Bettman has said that a three-week training camp period will be necessary before the league returns to action, and players may need to quarantine for a few weeks before those camps get underway. 

As for the timeline, the league was initially targeting a restart in early July but sources have told CBS Sports that mid-to-late July is now being viewed as the most optimistic scenario. If there’s a 3-5 week preparation window and meaningful games are to be played before August, the league would likely need to transition out of Phase 2 and into Phase 3 by mid-to-late June. 

What is the plan if/when play resumes?

Though the NHL still has 189 games remaining on the regular season schedule, it’s expected that the league would jump straight into the postseason in the event that play can resume. Late last week, the NHLPA approved a league proposal for a 24-team playoff to be hosted in two separate hub cities — one for each conference. 

Under that proposal, the top 12 teams from each conference would qualify for the playoffs, with the top four teams from each conference getting a play-in bye (they would participate in a three-game round robin to stay fresh). The remaining eight teams from each conference would play a best-of-five series for the four remaining spots in a traditional 16-team bracket. From there, the NHL hopes to play a best-of-seven series the remainder of the way until a Stanley Cup champion is crowned.



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Murat Gassiev ‘better-suited’ to heavyweight than Oleksandr Usyk, says Abel Sanchez | Boxing News

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James Dielhenn

Senior Boxing Journalist @JamesDielhenn

“Will Usyk have the strength to handle heavyweights? He doesn’t have a big punch”

Last Updated: 25/05/20 8:12am










0:50

Oleksandr Usyk attempted to defuse any tension at the face off with Dereck Chisora by asking for a selfie with his opponent!

Oleksandr Usyk attempted to defuse any tension at the face off with Dereck Chisora by asking for a selfie with his opponent!

Murat Gassiev is “as big a puncher as the best heavyweights” and wants revenge on Oleksandr Usyk, says his trainer Abel Sanchez.

Gassiev was IBF and WBA cruiserweight champion but his thunderous run was ended in the World Boxing Super Series final by Usyk in 2018 – both boxers have now joined the heavyweight division.

Asked if Gassiev is better-suited to the bigger division, Sanchez told Sky Sports: “Absolutely. He was killing himself to make weight for cruiserweight. That’s not an excuse – Usyk was the better man on the night.

Gassiev was a unified cruiserweight champion

Gassiev was a unified cruiserweight champion

“We look forward to meeting Usyk at heavyweight.”

Russia’s Gassiev hasn’t fought in two years but is still just 27 years old.

“I first started working with him when he was nearly 20 years old,” Sanchez explained. “He was 192lbs back then.

“I saw his frame and his hands – he has tremendously big hands. I said: ‘This young man will dominate the cruiserweight ranks then become a very good heavyweight’.

“It took a little longer to get to the heavyweights, but he will be good. I anticipated this when I first started working with him. His hands told me everything.

“He is as big a puncher as the best heavyweights.

“Like Evander Holyfield he has the speed of a cruiserweight. His speed and quickness will be the difference against heavyweights, the same as Oleksandr Usyk.

0:59
Anthony Joshua wants to line up fights against bitter rival Dillian Whyte and mandatory challenger Oleksandr Usyk

Anthony Joshua wants to line up fights against bitter rival Dillian Whyte and mandatory challenger Oleksandr Usyk

“But will Usyk have the strength to handle heavyweights? He doesn’t have a big punch. In the heavyweight division you need to have something that keeps people back.”

Sanchez said about Gassiev’s return: “I would like to fight Adam Kownacki, Robert Helenius or Andy Ruiz Jr. But he hasn’t fought in two years so I would like a tune-up fight first.”

Usyk won his heavyweight debut against Chazz Witherspoon and will next take on Derek Chisora. The former undisputed cruiserweight champion is the mandatory challenger to Anthony Joshua’s WBO heavyweight title.



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