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South Bay Small Business Owners Cheer Santa Clara County Plans for Reopening – CBS San Francisco

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SAN JOSE (KPIX) — The county that enacted the first stay-at-home order in the Bay Area took a major step in reopening its economy Thursday.

“This marks the end of a phased reopening and the beginning of a new stage,” said Santa Clara County public health officer Dr. Sara Cody. “We need to adapt. This virus has adapted to us and we need to adapt to the virus.”

Instead of naming specific businesses that will be allowed to reopen, Cody announced “risk reduction” measures for all businesses to meet, which include social distancing, wearing masks and capacity limits. The new protocol requires that no more than one employee is allowed per 250 gross square feet and no more than one customer per 150 square feet of open space.

Businesses, including hair and nail salons, will be allowed to reopen July 13 or when the state approves the county’s plan, whichever is later. The county planned to submit its plan to the state on Thursday.

“I’m so happy just to hear a date to get back to work,” said Erica Martin, a stylist at W’s Salon on Santana Row in San Jose.

Martin has been vocal in the community about allowing hair salons to reopen as other neighboring communities gave the industry the green light to get back to business. Stylists and barbers have argued they are trained in strict cleaning and sanitizing protocols as part of their certification process.

Martin said as soon as Cody made her announcement, clients began to call.

“There’s been multiple phone calls of, ‘When can you get me in?’” she said.

Business owners are now required to submit their safety protocol plans to the county, plans which will also be accessible to the public.

“It’s … clear criteria and we are asking businesses to be entrepreneurial, be creative, in meeting those criteria,” said the county’s counsel James Williams.

State orders will always supersede county orders and high-risk businesses such as indoor dining and bars must remain closed.

Martin said the salon she works at is already prepared to welcome back customers. Her salon has partitions, thermometers and liability waivers.

“The guidelines are already protocols we’ve been following as far as cleanliness goes,” Martin said. “I’m going to be wearing a mask and you’re going to be wearing masks, we won’t be having any waiting rooms and we’ll be checking your temperature.”

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Spice is right as Indonesian startups eye value in vanilla | Reuters | Business

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By Fransiska Nangoy and Bernadette Christina

JAKARTA (Reuters) – Indonesian Sofa Arbiyanto had a manufacturing job in South Korea two years ago when he learned about the high price of vanilla on the global market, and decided to try his luck at growing it.

Now he has 2,000 vanilla vines on a 1,200-sq-metre (0.3-acre) farm in Blora, Central Java, started after he did some internet research and joined online groups of vanilla farmers.

“My initial view that farmers live in hardship and poverty has changed,” said the 30-year-old. “With a touch of innovation and technology, it is a promising opportunity.”

Arbiyanto is one of a growing number of millennial start-up vanilla farmers in the southeast Asian nation, which is eager to revive spice shipments to diversify its farm exports, now dominated by palm oil.

The interest in cultivating one of the world’s most valuable spices has sparked a small movement back to the land at a time when farmers have been leaving for jobs in congested cities.

The Indonesian Vanilla Farmers’ Association (PPVI) says 43% of the nearly 600 farmers it has trained are aged between 25 and 35, a demographic that is typically tech-savvy.

Many have learned farming methods from YouTube, and get tips and guidance from experienced farmers through group chats on messaging platforms such as WhatsApp, said Mahdalena Lubis, the association’s spokeswoman.

PPVI’s YouTube channel has more than 13,000 subscribers and combined views of its videos exceed a million, she added.

The demand is no surprise, as vanilla beans from top exporter Madagascar were more expensive than silver last year, although prices have since fallen from highs of about $600 a kg.

After typhoons in 2017 and 2018 in the Indian Ocean island sent prices skyrocketing, buyers are looking for more sources of the spice, used in anything from cakes and cookies to sauces and perfume.

Start-up Indonesian farmers are betting on the labour-intensive beans, aware that high-quality crops can fetch them better prices, owing to the painstaking process of pollination by hand.

STRONG POTENTIAL

Indonesia is a distant second to top producer Madagascar, which provides 80% of world supply. McCormick & Co, the world’s largest spice company, is partnering with farmers in the islands of Papua and Sulawesi to secure its supply of Indonesian vanilla.

“Although Madagascar remains the gold standard as far as vanilla quality is concerned, Indonesia has strong potential to become an alternative origin, in terms of quantity and quality,” McCormick said in an emailed statement.

The coronavirus pandemic has boosted consumer demand for vanilla, as well as that from packaged food companies, it added.

Aust & Hachmann, the world’s oldest vanilla trader, estimated that Indonesia would produce about 200 tonnes of beans this year, double last year’s estimate.

In a bi-annual report, the trader said stay-at-home orders around the world had benefitted vanilla, with jumps in grocery shopping and home cooking.

Despite strong demand, shipments faced delays because of virus-related disruptions in trade, causing an annual drop of 18% for the January to May period, Indonesian trade data showed.

But that trend is unlikely to last.

“When the new normal begins and trade activities are gradually increased…vanilla exports will become one of the mainstays of trade that will be expanded,” said Kasan, a director-general in Indonesia’s trade ministry.

But vanilla prices can be volatile, making farming a risky enterprise, Kasan, who uses one name, cautioned.

Lubis, of the vanilla farmers’ group, said ensuring quality was vital to avoid mistakes of the kind that had led big buyers in the past to reject prematurely picked beans, forcing many farmers to switch crops.

“In the global market, we have to be able to compete in maintaining quality to be able to significantly increase our exports,” Lubis added.

But Mohamad Akbar Budiman, 30, is undeterred as he combines work as a civil servant in the province of Banten with an effort to revive once-abandoned cultivation of beans in his backyard.

“Growing vanilla doesn’t take much space, and it’s not difficult.”

(Editing by Martin Petty and Clarence Fernandez)



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China extends anti-dumping tariff on Indian fibre optic product | Reuters | Business

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SINGAPORE (Reuters) – China is extending an anti-dumping tariff on a fibre optic product made in India, the Ministry of Commerce said on Thursday.

The punitive tariff on single-mode optical fibre takes effect from Aug. 14 and lasts for five years, with tariffs ranging between 7.4% and 30.6% depending on the specific Indian manufacturers, the ministry said.

China previously slapped an anti-dumping tariff on the same Indian product for five years until mid-August of 2019 and then had a review of the case.

(Reporting by Chen Aizhu; Editing by Tom Hogue)



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County of Grande Prairie surveying business satisfaction

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The County of Grande Prairie is looking to once again meet with local businesses to evaluate some of the struggles and opportunities for improvement within the region. The interviews are a continuation of the Business Retention and Expansion Study which was initially conducted at the end of 2019.

Christopher King, County of Grande Prairie Economic Development Manager, says the idea, though it has had to adapt to the times, is to review the state of businesses and gauge what their plans are going forward.

“Obviously with COVID-19 we’ve handled things a little bit differently but the idea is to identify those businesses that maybe are looking at expansion opportunities, or growth opportunities, or maybe even those that are struggling a little bit and are considering downsizing or closing,” he explains.

In 2019, the survey found that roughly 98 per cent of businesses in the County were satisfied with their location as a place to do business. Factors that received the highest rates of satisfaction were the availability of appropriate work-related training, zoning, availability of property for purchase or lease, and availability of adequate housing and development/building permit process.

King says the survey didn’t come back all sunshine and roses, as many businesses shared prominent concerns regarding what they believed was sorely lacking within the County.

“Skilled labour, issues related to internet [and] cell phone reception, came out as some of the least satisfying factors of doing business in the county and Council has taken note of that,” he says.

“Communications work on fibre-optics and cell phones have been jumped up as strategic priorities for Council.”

Any findings from the 2020 study will be published by the County later in the year. Details from the survey conducted last year is also available online.



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