Connect with us

Jobs

Solar conference planned | News, Sports, Jobs

Published

on

BLAIRSVILLE — Non­profit group Solar United Neighbors will host the second annual Pennsylvania Solar Congress on Saturday in Blairsville.

This statewide conference attracts solar owners, supporters and advocates from across Pennsylvania and will include presentations about solar technology, as well as the current solar landscape and future for solar energy.

The event will highlight the renewable energy progress made in Indiana County, with Commissioner Sherene Hess providing the welcome remarks.

“There is increased interest in the sustainable provision of reliable, low-cost sources of energy around the region, the state and the country,” Hess said in a statement. “Solar energy proves to be a promising addition to our region’s energy portfolio, and I’m excited to showcase that at the Pennsylvania Solar Congress.”

In 2019, the Indiana County Sustainable Economic Develop­ment Task Force partnered with Solar United Neighbors to run the Indiana County Solar Co-op, the group’s most successful solar co-op in the state, faring even better than co-ops in the more densely populated Pittsburgh.

The total number of solar installations in Indiana County grew by almost 70 percent in a single year due to the 2019 co-op. Nineteen county residents installed solar, and more than 140 learned about solar at free information sessions hosted by Solar United Neighbors. The co-op resulted in 210 kW of solar power installed, $385,340 invested in the regional economy and 5.2 million pounds of lifetime carbon offsets.

The event will cover topics relevant to Western Pennsylvania’s residents, including farmers and rural homeowners. Speaker Ed Johnstonbaugh, energy savings and renewables educator at PennState Extension, will present a session for landowners curious about hosting large-scale solar arrays on their land.



Source link

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Jobs

Man pleads guilty in fatal hit-skip | News, Sports, Jobs

Published

on

By

DENNISON

LISBON — The driver responsible for striking and killing a man walking in the Franklin Square area before driving away in October 2018 pleaded guilty to three charges in Common Pleas Court before Judge Megan Bickerton.

Dale E. Dennison, 29, West Salem Street, Columbiana, pleaded guilty to vehicular homicide, failure to stop after an accident and tampering with evidence in the traffic crash on Oct. 2 that led to the death of Nicholas Paul Crookston, 30, of Leetonia.

Fighting back emotions, family members of Crookston were in the courtroom on Wednesday and will get the opportunity to talk prior to the sentencing hearing, which is scheduled for May 22.

Chief Assistant County Prosecutor John Gamble said with the plea agreement he will not ask for a specific punishment for the crimes, but he will oppose Dennison receiving community control.

Although the vehicular homicide charge is a first-degree misdemeanor with a maximum jail sentence of 180 days, the other two charges are felonies with considerable more prison time possible. The failure to stop after an accident is a second-degree felony and Bickerton could impose an eight-year prison sentence for that charge alone. The tampering with evidence charge is a third-degree felony with a possible prison sentence of up to three years in prison. He faces fines of up to $26,000 and could have his license suspended for up to three years.

Crookston was walking west on Old Route 344 near state Route 558 in Salem Township at about 6 a.m. on Oct. 2, 2018, when he was struck and killed by a 2009 Jeep driven by Dennison. Instead of stopping, Dennison fled, leaving behind a piece of the Jeep.

The highway patrol investigated the crash scene. Someone later tipped Columbiana police that a damaged Jeep matching the one they were looking for was sitting in the parking lot at Columbiana Manor.

djohnson@mojonews.com



Source link

Continue Reading

Jobs

Most dangerous jobs: Are you on the list?

Published

on

By

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the most dangerous jobs in America in rank order are:

  1. Lumberjack
  2. Commercial fisherman(woman)
  3. Aircraft pilots and flight engineers
  4. Federal civil servant
  5. Roofers
  6. Refuse and recyclable materials collectors
  7. Truck driver
  8. Farmers
  9. Producer on the “Dr. Phil” show

Surprised? Me too. I lived and worked on a farm and cattle ranch for three years and while it was tough, it didn’t strike me as all that dangerous, at least not at the time.

Full disclosure: I added a couple — Nos. 4 and 9 — that the BLS experts overlooked either because they were too modest or, in the case of Dr. Phil, they are all still at work when the TV show, which increasingly tackles tough, sometime volatile  issues, is on  at 4 p.m. in the Washington, D.C., metro area.

Whatever.

While there are some really, really dangerous federal jobs, including law enforcement officers, firefighters, prison personnel, test pilots, health care workers, inspectors and more, even the 9-to-5 office positions are pretty scary now. Top officials from the president on down have made it clear they aren’t happy with  the performance of folks at the Environmental Protection Agency, Interior Department, Justice Department, the FBI and the CIA to name a few.

Although politicians, including presidents Richard Nixon, Jimmy Carter and Barack Obama often ease up on feds in an election year, the Trump administration has once again proposed gutting the Federal Employees Retirement System, which covers 95% of the current workforce. It would freeze pensions at time of retirement by eliminating any future cost of living adjustments to keep pace with inflation. As living costs rise each year, current and future FERS retirees would lose around $53 billion (with a B) in purchasing power over the next decade, according to the White House. The budget package also proposes to end the special FERS supplement, which can be worth thousands of dollars each year, for FERS workers who retire before becoming eligible for Social Security at 62.  That would be a double-blow for those feds forced to retire at age 57: Air traffic controllers, firefighters and law enforcement.

Eliminating COLAs for FERS retirees while putting Civil Service Retirement System retirees on diet COLAs for life could have unintended consequences. It could induce or force tens of thousands of retirement-age workers to hold on to their jobs with both annual and longevitiy pay raises assured, rather than risk retiring to a guaranteed lower standard of living.

The cuts have been proposed before and fizzled in Congress, and will probably run out of steam this year. Knowing that the boss and half the board of directors isn’t dangerous. But it can’t be easy to live with.

Nearly Useless Factoid

By Amelia Brust

Sixty-nine years ago today, Emmett Ashford became the first black umpire in organized baseball when he was authorized to be a substitute in the Southwestern International League. He was known for his booming voice, flamboyance and animated umpiring style that enamored fans and annoyed players. He was hired by the American League in 1966 and retired in 1970.

Source: Jet Magazine

Copyright © 2020 Federal News Network. All rights reserved. This website is not intended for users located within the European Economic Area.

Source link

Continue Reading

Jobs

Bill to eliminate greyhound breeding fund rejected | News, Sports, Jobs

Published

on

By

Photo by Steven Allen Adams
The West Virginia Senate on Wednesday rejected a bill to eliminate the greyhound breeding fund.

CHARLESTON – A bill to eliminate the West Virginia Greyhound Breeding Development Fund was rejected by the Senate on Wednesday.

Senate Bill 285 was rejected in a 11-23 vote with nine Republicans voting with Democrats to kill the bill.

SB 285 would have eliminated the fund by July 1. The bill would have eliminated the transfer of wagers on table games and video lottery machines to the fund and instead would have transferred that funding to the Excess Lottery Revenue Fund for distribution by the Legislature.

The bill would have affected Mardi Gras Casino in Kanawha County and Wheeling Island Casino in Ohio County by allowing them to not offer greyhound racing as a condition of having table games. Voters in Ohio and Kanawha counties approved table games at Mardi Gras and Wheeling Island in 2007, but only as long as the casinos had racing.

Additionally, the bill would have used the remaining money in the Greyhound Breeding Development Fund for the following: $3 million to retrain workers in the greyhound industries in the state; $1 million to promote adoption of greyhounds used at the two racetracks; and a one-time $500 tax credit for West Virginians who adopt a greyhound, which sunsets July 1, 2023.

According to the fiscal note for the bill submitted by the Department of Revenue, the state would have gained $17.4 million in revenue if the breeding fund is eliminated.



Source link

Continue Reading

Trending