Connect with us

Finance

Sask. daycare providers calling on government for financial support during COVID-19 pandemic

Published

on

SASKATOON —
Daycare providers in Saskatchewan say they’re facing numerous challenges as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, and are calling on the provincial government to provide financial assistance.

Lindsay Jaworski has been running her licensed daycare for almost four years.

However, the COVID-19 pandemic is causing her to consider closing temporarily.

“Should I stay open? Should I close? It’s tough because we don’t really know what direction to go right now,” Jaworski said.

She said none of her parents are essential workers and most of them are pulling their kids out of daycare because they don’t need it right now or can no longer afford it.

Jaworski is worried that closing could affect the kids she looks after.

“The kids do really need this daycare feel, it’s normalcy. They aren’t getting that and I’m seeing that they’re anxious and they are nervous, but coming in and getting them to play and laugh, it’s really helping. And just the thought of closing and not being able to see these kids again for who knows how long, that’s scary.”

It’s this reason and wanting to help essential workers that some daycare operators are choosing to stay open.

Jaworski, who is part of a daycare networking group that consists of approximately 230 women across Saskatchewan, said the issue is that daycare operators don’t have access to financial aid if they are still open, so many of their incomes have dropped.

This is an issue for Jodie Pren, a private dayhome provider in Saskatoon.

“My biggest concern is that I’ve lost 50 per cent of my income, and can’t fill the spots because my own children are home from school. I’m left without the opportunity to recover those wages but also don’t qualify for any assistance. There are so many gaps in the system that seem to let us relentlessly fall through the cracks. At every turn, the wording depicting who is ‘qualified’ for help is so vague that I’m left feeling like maybe I do qualify, but what if I don’t?” Pren said in a release.

Emily Mills who operates a daycare in rural Saskatchewan shares this view and said there are ongoing expenses even when kids aren’t there.

“Most of us sacrifice a huge part of our homes to use for daycare (like our basements). Even if children are not there playing in our playroom, we are still paying for our furnace to heat the area. Many of us also have daycare vehicles that we are still paying off (even if they are parked and not being used),” Mills said in a release.

These daycare operators are also asking for assurance from the government that if they choose to close their doors for their own safety reasons, they’ll have access to financial aid.

“What I think all us daycare providers need is that extra assistance for running and topping off if we don’t have enough numbers and we can’t do this financially. And the option to get financially assisted if we do need to close,” Jaworski said.

Chris Hodges, media relations consultant with the Ministry of Education, said the government recognizes the vital role child care operators continue to play during the pandemic and respects the decisions these organizations have made with regards to staying open or closing.

“The Government of Saskatchewan will continue to provide regular government grants to licensed child care facilities including home based – whether open or closed – through April, and are assessing the situation as it relates to the continuation of that funding. This would include the regular monthly nutrition grant that is provided to licensed home child care providers.”

Hodges said licensed child care facilities have not been mandated to stay open.

“The school-based centres that are providing service to workers responding to the COVID-19 pandemic, are making these spaces available voluntarily.”

The province said it’s working to minimize the financial impact to those centres who are providing this service.

“I do think daycare providers job isn’t done in this pandemic yet and I don’t think we should get checked off…we just need attention and we need care too,” Jaworski.

Source link

Finance

Liberals turn over thousands of pages on WE decision

Published

on

By

OTTAWA — The federal Liberal government has turned over thousands of pages of documents related to the WE controversy to a House of Commons’ committee, which lawyers are now vetting for personal information and cabinet secrets.

The finance committee demanded the documents last month as it probes whether Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s relationship with WE Charity influenced the government’s ill-fated decision to have the organization run a $912-million student-volunteer program.

The Liberals handed more than 5,000 pages about the decision to the committee over the weekend, but it isn’t clear when they will be released to members as parliamentary lawyers are going through them to prevent the release of protected information.

Committee members are hoping the documents will shed light on the discussions that led to the decision to have WE run the Canada Student Services Grant, before the deal was cancelled in early July.

Employment Minister Carla Qualtrough and Small Business Minister Mary Ng are expected to appear before the committee on Wednesday to discuss the grant program, which promised to pay students up to $5,000 for volunteering.

Trudeau has apologized for not recusing himself from cabinet discussions about the WE deal given his family’s relationship with the charity, but has denied any wrongdoing.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published Aug. 9, 2020.

The Canadian Press

Source link

Continue Reading

Finance

U.S., U.K., Canada, Others Express ‘Deep Concern’ Over Hong Kong

Published

on

By

(Bloomberg) —

The governments of the U.S., U.K., Australia, Canada and New Zealand said they are “gravely concerned” by the Hong Kong government’s decision to postpone legislative elections and bar pro-democracy candidates from participating.

“These moves have undermined the democratic process that has been fundamental to Hong Kong’s stability and prosperity,” the U.S. secretary of state and foreign ministers from the other countries said in a joint statement.

They also expressed “deep concern” over Beijing’s imposition of the new National Security Law in Hong Kong, which will make it a crime to advocate for independence from China. The law “is eroding the Hong Kong people’s fundamental rights and liberties,” the statement said.

“We support the legitimate expectations of the people of Hong Kong to elect Legislative Council representatives via genuinely free, fair, and credible elections. We call on the Hong Kong government to reinstate the eligibility of disqualified candidates so that the elections can take place in an environment conducive to the exercise of democratic rights and freedoms.”

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

Subscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.

©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

Source link

Continue Reading

Finance

Mideast Markets Trade Mixed With Aramco, Oil Eyed: Inside EM

Published

on

By

(Bloomberg) —

Middle Eastern equities were mixed as investors weighed the outlook for oil and after Saudi Aramco kept its dividend unchanged even after posting a slump in profit for the second quarter.

Stock benchmarks in Kuwait, Oman, Bahrain and Abu Dhabi rose, while those in Saudi Arabia, Dubai, Qatar and Israel declined. Aramco shares gained as much 0.5% after it said it will pay $18.75 billion in dividends for the second quarter, matching the payout for the first three months of the year.

The oil giant disclosed a 73% drop in profit for the second quarter. Still, it is sticking to its payout plans while major competitors such as BP Plc and Royal Dutch Shell slashed dividends after the coronavirus pandemic upended the oil business.

On Friday, oil ministers from Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Kuwait, Iraq, Oman and Bahrain held a conference call to discuss the oil market, according to a joint statement. They reaffirmed their commitment to the OPEC+ agreement and said they are “very encouraged by the recent signs of improvement in the global economy.”

Investors should be “shifting their orientation to value stocks, especially those stocks that have the potential to emerge stronger from the pandemic,” said Iyad Abu Hweij, the managing partner at Allied Investment Partners PJSC.

MIDDLE EASTERN MARKETS:

The Tadawul All Share Index gains 0.3% as of 10:43 a.m. in RiyadhAl Rajhi Bank +0.7%, Banque Saudi Fransi +0.9%, Makkah Construction & Development +2.1%Kuwait’s Premier Market index gains 0.7%Kuwait Finance House, Ahli United Bank and National Bank of Kuwait climb between 0.5% and 1.6%, respectivelyREAD: NBK Needs to Enhance Revenue and Cut Costs to Navigate HeadwindsMORE: Kuwait’s Shamal Az-Zour to List on Stock Exchange Aug. 16Dubai’s DFM General Index drops 1.3%, with biggest lender Emirates NBD falling 1.6%Bad loans may grow within U.A.E’s deferred books without strong recovery, Bloomberg Inteligence analyst Edmond Christou writes in a note“U.A.E. banks’ initial review of the deferred-loan book shows that real estate, hospitality including services and retail are most affected”Indexes in Abu Dhabi, Bahrain and Oman climb as much as 0.3%, while those in Qatar and Israel fall as much as 0.3%

For more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com

Subscribe now to stay ahead with the most trusted business news source.

©2020 Bloomberg L.P.

Source link

Continue Reading

Trending