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Gov. Gen Julie Payette honours Canadians for bravery, volunteer service

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OTTAWA —
Gov. Gen. Julie Payette announced 123 Canadians who are being recognized for their skills, courage or dedication to service by receiving a decoration for bravery, a meritorious service decoration or the volunteer medal.

Here is a complete list of the award recipients and the reasons for their awards:

Star of Courage

Azzedine Soufiane, Quebec City — For sacrificing his life in an attempt to disarm the assailant during the mass shooting at the Grande Mosquee de Quebec on Jan. 29, 2017.

Medal of Bravery

Said Akjour, Quebec City — For attempting to confront the assailant during the mass shooting at the Grande Mosquee de Quebec on Jan. 29, 2017.

Hakim Chambaz, Quebec City — For rescuing a young girl during the mass shooting at the Grande Mosquee de Quebec on Jan. 29, 2017.

Aymen Derbali, Quebec City — For destabilizing the assailant during the mass shooting at the Grande Mosquee de Quebec on Jan. 29, 2017.

Mohamed Khabar, Quebec City — For attempting to confront the assailant during the mass shooting at the Grande Mosquee de Quebec on Jan. 29, 2017.

Charlie Brien, Mistissini, Que. — For rescuing a young girl from a house fire on May 9, 2018.

Debbra Cooper, Sicamous, B.C. — For intervening in an armed attack against her neighbour on April 2, 2019.

Kimberly Cossette, Calgary — For her efforts in preventing the abduction of a child on Sept. 26, 2018.

Myriam Cote, Montreal — For saving a man from drowning in the sea in Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic, on March 30, 2018.

Amber Dyck, Morinville, Alta. — For rescuing her infant from a house fire on May 15, 2019.

Russell Fee, Calgary — For rescuing a man from a wolf attack at the Rampart Creek campground, located near Lake Louise on Aug. 9, 2019.

Pierre Lessard, Lac-des-Ecorces, Que. — For rescuing his wife from a vehicle submerged in the Kiamika River on July 25, 2017.

Chris Scott, Edmonton — For saving a man from a burning vehicle on April 16, 2018.

RCMP Constable David Wynn (posthumous), St. Albert, Alta. — For sacrificing his life during a confrontation with an armed suspect at the Apex Casino on Jan. 17, 2015.

Meritorious Service Decorations (Civil Division)

Nahid Aboumansour, Montreal — For founding Petites-Mains, a social economy organization helping to improve the lives of immigrant women in Montreal.

Ian M. F. Arnold, Ottawa — For leading the committee that established the first National Standard of Canada for Psychological Health and Safety in the Workplace.

Darcy Ataman, Winnipeg — For founding Make Music Matter, an organization that helps survivors of armed conflict overcome emotional trauma.

Robert T. Banno (deceased), Burnaby, B.C. — For his leadership in the creation of Nikkei Place, a landmark cultural institution in Burnaby that unites the Japanese-Canadian community.

Kathryn Blain, Waterloo, Ont. — For founding the Meningitis Research Foundation of Canada, which promotes awareness and prevention of the illness in Canada and internationally.

Sandy Boutin, Montreal — For founding the Festival de musique emergente en Abitibi-Temiscamingue and for promoting Francophone culture.

Michael Andrew Burns, Toronto — For spearheading the Invictus Games 2017, a world-class sporting event for injured armed service members and veterans.

Franca Damiani Carella (posthumous), Woodbridge, Ont. — For establishing the Vitanova Foundation, a facility dedicated to the rehabilitation of those struggling with substance abuse.

Mackie Greene and Joseph Michael Howlett (posthumous), Wilson’s Beach, N.B. — For founding the Campobello Whale Rescue Team, a volunteer group that disentangles distressed whales from fishing gear.

Harry Ing, Deep River, Ont. — For founding Bubble Technology Industries, a corporation at the forefront of development in the field of nuclear radiation detection.

Cynthia Lickers-Sage, Lisa Steele, Kim Tomczak and Wanda vanderStoop, Toronto — For founding the imagineNATIVE Film & Media Arts Festival to showcase Indigenous filmmaking talent from around the world.

Nicole Marcil-Gratton (posthumous) and Michele Viau-Chagnon, Montreal — For founding The Lighthouse, Children and Families, and Maison Andre-Gratton, the first pediatric palliative care home in Quebec.

Matthew Pearce, Montreal — For leading the transformation of the Old Brewery Mission in Montreal to create more stable housing solutions for people facing homelessness.

Jonathan Pitre (posthumous), Embrun, Ont. — For raising awareness of epidermolysis bullosa, a debilitating skin disorder that ultimately took Jonathan’s life.

Gregory Sadetsky, Montreal — For developing emergency call location software to assist U.S. public safety authorities.

Byron Smith, Carleton Place, Ont. — For co-founding Ride For Dad, which raises funds for and awareness of prostate cancer research through large-scale, one-day ride events.

Meritorious Service Medal

Adrian Bercovici and Natalie Bercovici, Montreal — For creating Generations Foundation, a Montreal-based organization that tackles child poverty by providing free school meals.

Yves Berthiaume, Hawkesbury, Ont. — For his leadership as the head of Optimist International and for his contributions to youth education.

Subhas Bhargava and Uttra Bhargava, Ottawa — For their philanthropic initiatives in support of innovative research into and awareness of neurodegenerative diseases.

Tina Boileau, Embrun, Ont. — For raising awareness of epidermolysis bullosa, a debilitating skin disorder that ultimately took her son Jonathan Pitre’s life.

Deborrah Sharon Bradwell and Kenneth Bradwell (posthumous), Burlington, Ont. — For establishing the Sian Bradwell Foundation, which supports the purchase of medical equipment essential for the diagnosis, treatment and research of pediatric cancer.

Louise Joanne Foster-Martin, Brampton, Ont. — For anonymously performing hundreds of acts of kindness for strangers to help them overcome personal challenges and adversity.

Todd Alan Halpern, Toronto — For his philanthropy in support of the University Health Network, notably through the creation of the Grand Cru Culinary Wine Festival.

Jim Hayhurst Sr. (posthumous), Toronto — For his role in founding Trails Youth Initiatives, which helps support and guide marginalized youth in becoming contributing members of their communities.

Alexis Kearney Hillyard, Edmonton — For creating Stump Kitchen, a YouTube channel that celebrates healthy cooking and body diversity.

Mike Hirschbach, Halifax — For starting the Circus Circle outreach program, which provides street youth with a safe space to experience positive recreation.

Jacques Janson, Ottawa — For his contributions to honouring the sacrifice of Francophone soldiers from western Canada.

Superintendent Heinz A. J. Kuck (retired), from the North York area of Toronto — For performing arduous physical challenges in support of people facing poverty, crime or illness.

Veronique Leduc, Montreal — For her determination to combat social exclusion as the first deaf university professor in Quebec.

Gerard Barry Losier, Miramichi, N.B. — For his philanthropy and for championing improved care for the elderly and those facing life-ending illnesses in the Miramichi region.

Taylor MacGillivray, Jeremie Saunders and Brian Matthew Stever, Halifax and Dartmouth, N.S. — For creating Sickboy, a no-holds-barred podcast that evokes frank discussion on living with chronic or life-ending illnesses.

Alan Melanson, Annapolis Royal, N.S. — For creating the Candlelight Graveyard Tour and for bringing the history of Annapolis Royal to life for countless tourists each year.

Glori Meldrum, Edmonton — For founding Little Warriors, a non-profit organization committed to preventing child sexual abuse and helping victims heal.

James Mercer, Stephenville Crossing, N.L. — For creating programs that promote traditional instruments and folk music integral to the heritage of Newfoundland’s west coast.

Father Fred Monk, Medicine Hat, Alta. — For starting Mission Mexico, an organization that funds education, health and social projects in an impoverished region of Mexico.

Dean Otto and Jeanine Otto, the Nepean area of Ottawa — For founding Maddy’s Gala, which raises money for the Roger Neilson House pediatric residential hospice.

Mavis Ramsey and Ron Ramsey, Terrace, B.C. — For founding Helping Hands, a charity that assists local residents with the cost of prescriptions and medical expenses.

Mike Ranta, Killarney, Ont. — For supporting youth and veterans through his cross-country canoe expeditions, which have also highlighted Canada’s interconnectedness and its canoe heritage.

Sylvie Remillard, St-Remi, Que. — For founding Sourire sans Fin, a centre for family solidarity to end poverty in Monteregie.

Kennith James Skwleqs Robertson, Toronto — For creating Four Directions Autism, and for highlighting gaps in autism spectrum disorder advocacy and the need for culturally relevant services.

Catherine Ross, Winnipeg — For founding KIDS Initiative to support humanitarian projects and motivate Canadians to take action against global poverty.

Jane Adele Roy, Bedford, N.S. — For founding the Catapult Leadership Society to provide Nova Scotian teens with experiences that develop their potential as future leaders.

James Scott, Kingsville, Ont. — For embedding the values of philanthropy and social commitment in his manufacturing business and for giving generously to his community.

Ariel Shlien and Ron Shlien, Montreal — For founding Mad Science, a corporate pioneer in introducing children to the wonders of science through fun learning experiences.

Peter Smyth, Edmonton — For inspiring change in how at-risk youth interact with social services in Edmonton through harm reduction and stronger relationships.

Jean-Pierre Tchang, St-Pamphile, Que. — For founding IRIS Mundial, an organization that provides eye care to people living in developing countries.

Lanre Tunji-Ajayi, Barrie, Ont. — For creating the Sickle Cell Awareness Group of Ont. and for helping to raise awareness of the cause of sickle cell anemia in Canada.

Sylvana Villata-Micillo, Montreal — For founding the Institut d’Etudes Mediterraneennes de Montreal and for promoting Mediterranean culture, science and art.

Sovereign’s Medal for Volunteers

Qapik Attagutsiak, Arctic Bay, Nunavut — For sharing her knowledge of northern health care and her expertise in midwifery over the past 80 years.

Lt.-Col. Michael Bisson, Ottawa — For helping to improve the quality of life of veterans in his community over the past 24 years.

John Bryant, Ottawa — For his volunteer work on the railway collections of the Bytown Railway Society and the Canada Science and Technology Museum over the past three decades.

Patricia Cimmeck, Calgary — For making a positive impact on the lives of hundreds of children with ostomies for more than 25 years.

Alan Davidson, Calgary — For supporting local Scout groups since 1968, as well as for connecting thousands of youth globally through the annual Jamboree on the Air program.

Navy Lt. Joseph Dollis, Chateauguay, Que. — For his work with cadets and their leaders through various branches of the Navy League of Canada for more than four decades.

Sean Donohue, Kingston, Ont. — For his commitment to the safety of his community through the Kingston Police Community Volunteers over the past two decades.

Pearl Dorey, Edmonton — For her efforts to care for the residents of the long-term care facility in her retirement home over the past decade.

Dale Drysdale, Victoria — For his involvement in operational and training search and rescue flights since 1992, and for his work with the Canadian Scottish Regimental Museum.

Gilles Dube, Riviere-du-Loup, Que. — For his involvement in promoting and implementing cultural infrastructures in his community for more than half a century.

Private William Dwyer, Barrie, Ont. — For his efforts as an active fundraiser supporting multiple organizations, such as the Terry Fox Foundation, for more than four decades.

Susan Nelson Epstein, London, Ont. — For founding the Arthur Ford Outdoor Educational Foundation, and for creating and maintaining a natural learning space for students for more than three decades.

Sean Falle, Calgary — For more than 20 years of service as a Scout leader in Calgary and for helping youth connect globally.

Captain Jacques J. Gagne (retired), Rockland, Ont. — For his work supporting military families through the Royal Military Colleges Club of Canada and the Royal Military Colleges Foundation since 2004.

Lisa Gausman, Calgary — For her efforts over the past 15 years to help ensure Canadian youth with ostomies experience camp in a safe and accepting environment.

Theresa Grabowski, Courtice, Ont. — For giving people with special needs the chance to participate in team sports since 1994.

Darrell Helyar, Montreal — For making his neighbourhood safer and his community stronger over the past 10 years as president of the Victor-Hugo/Lucien L’Allier Residents Association.

Gary Hewitt, Whitehorse, Yukon — For his community work and for his commitment to organizing the Arctic Winter Games since 1970.

Jacquelin Holzman, Ottawa — For her dedication to her community since the 1960s and for her advocacy of quality end-of-life care.

Greg Johnson, Sherwood Park, Alta. — For connecting youth with their community through sports and for fostering inclusivity and acceptance for more than 10 years.

Gwendolyn Johnston, Clinton, Ont. — For volunteering in the community over the past four decades and for supporting the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

Master Warrant Officer Melissa Kehoe, from the Nepean area of Ottawa — For volunteering with the Bytown Gunners Firepower Museum since 1999, and for managing the “Radio Kehoe┬í” mailing list for current and former military members.

Lt.-Col. Mark James Levi Kennedy, Burnaby, B.C. — For his leadership of two community scouting groups since 1990 and for his work with Mission Possible since 2010.

Lewis Arlo King, Calgary — For more than half a century of volunteer work to benefit veterans and youth in his community.

Sylvia Kitching, Whitehorse, Yukon — For volunteering with her local branch of the Royal Canadian Legion for more than three decades.

Francoise Landry, Smooth Rock Falls, Ont. — For keeping her town clean and for encouraging others to respect their community and the environment for more than 60 years.

Monique Lavallee, Morinville, Alta. — For her efforts to ensure equal access to sports for all children in her community since 2001.

Warren Law, Toronto — For supporting local health care initiatives, patient advocacy and the reduction of health inequities in Ontario.

Romeo Levasseur, Pembroke, Ont. — For supporting youth in his community and for ensuring the well-being of veterans and their families through the Royal Canadian Legion over the past 45 years.

Cpl. Brian Lussier, Camrose, Alta. — For his support of a local children’s day home program and for mentoring and training cadets since 2002.

Leslie Anne Macaulay, Calgary — For her support of youth in her community and for her leadership in various scouting roles since 2002.

Charlene McInnis, Charlottetown — For bringing veterans in her community together through advocacy and events since 2001.

Robert Miller, Stephenville, N.L. — For his community work since 1985 and for his ongoing support as a founding member of the Bay St. George Sick Children’s Foundation.

Micheline Morin, Notre-Dame-du-Portage, Que. — For supporting seniors in her region through her involvement in the Association des benevoles du Centre hospitalier regional du Grand-Portage over the past 25 years.

Douglas Munroe, Ottawa — For volunteering with various branches of the Royal Canadian Legion for more than 40 years.

Lt.-Cmdr. Donna Murakami, Mississauga, Ont. — For contributing to the well-being of veterans in her community by organizing meals and transportation, and acquiring necessary equipment.

Brian North, Aurora, Ont. — For his volunteer service to his community since 2001, notably with the Aurora Chamber of Commerce and the Southlake Regional Health Centre Foundation.

Brendan O’Donnell, Stanbridge East, Que. — For dedicating the past 38 years to compiling bibliographies on the history of Quebec’s English-speaking communities into an online public resource.

Douglas Paul Pflug, Amherstburg, Ont. — For his dedication to coaching the Guelph-Wellington Buns Masters Rollers Special Olympics floor hockey team since 1989, and for encouraging community service and healthy relationships through the University of Guelph Varsity Gryphons football team.

June Raymond, Whitehorse, Yukon — For offering her diverse skills to the Golden Age Society over the past 25 years, as an active board member, president, cook, organizer, fundraiser and host.

Jeffrey Smith, Montreal — For his more than three decades with Scouts Canada, and for increasing community awareness, expanding membership and facilitating an online registration system for the organization.

Mark Symington, Brampton, Ont. — For providing first aid training, medical response at public events and general assistance to the Peel Medical Venturers for more than three decades.

Ralph Thomas, Saint John, N.B. — For encouraging diversity and physical well-being since 1981, as an ambassador of the New Brunswick Sports Hall of Fame and founder of the New Brunswick Black History Society.

Sharon Faye Thorne, The Pas, Man. — For supporting veterans through her 13 years of service with the Salvation Army and the Royal Canadian Legion.

Richard Tobin, from the Kanata area of Ottawa — For helping newcomers to Canada find jobs in their fields since 2009, through his involvement with the Ottawa Community Immigrant Services Organization.

Patricia Ellen Towell, Thunder Bay, Ont. — For serving meals to vulnerable members of her community through St. Paul’s Anglican Church and for visiting with isolated seniors for more than two decades.

Reid Whynot, East LaHave, N.S. — For his community dedication over the past 15 years, from conducting street patrols to coaching hockey and raising funds for the Canada Muscular Dystrophy Association.

Maj. William Worden, Winnipeg — For organizing community fundraisers and sharing the history of Scottish culture in Manitoba over the past 30 years.

SOURCE: Office of the Secretary to the Governor General

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 1, 2020.

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‘Hey, it’s 2020’ — COVID-19 shows need for faster internet in northern Ontario

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Brad Ducciaume looks down his road and doesn’t just see homes. He sees offices. He sees small businesses.

He knows his neighbours are also struggling to work from home during the pandemic with the sketchy DSL internet available in this corner of Greater Sudbury.

“Yes, it looks a little rural,” Ducciaume says standing on a gravel road, with thick forests in between the houses on Lammi Road.

“But we’re still in the main part of the city.”

Ducciaume moved here in 2018. It was a bigger place with room for his in-laws to move in, plus a good spot above the garage for his software firm, which he’s always run out of his home.

The people who owned the house before told him the internet was “lousy.” He later found out how right they were.

Ducciaume says with his current set-up he’s told he should be getting six megabits per second. He says he’s lucky to get two.

He has now had to rent space for his business, commute there every day and pay for internet service for the office, costing him an extra $12,000 a year. 

“Internet is not a ‘nice to have’ any more. It’s a necessity,” says Ducciaume. 

While many others are now working from home during the pandemic, poor internet service has forced Brad Ducciaume to rent an office in Sudbury for the software firm he used to run out of his house. (Erik White/CBC )

Angelina Jacobs and her partner moved from Mississauga to the shores of Lake Wanapitei last year.

The setting is beautiful, the internet service is not. 

She is connected to a satellite network, but she has to download TV shows onto her tablet and also uses her cellphone for work Zoom calls.

Jacobs and her partner have gotten into the habit of checking the weather forecast and running internet speed tests before planning their work days. 

When it’s really bad, she’ll make the short drive into Skead, where she grew up. It’s a tiny hamlet, but has something much closer to a big city internet signal. 

“It makes video conferencing impossible, because I’m just a pixilated mess,” says Jacobs, who helps businesses implement her company’s software.

Angelina Jacobs moved from Mississauga to the shores of Lake Wanapitei last year. The internet is not great, but she is hopeful that promises for improved service will come true in the near future. (Erik White/CBC )

Jacobs says clients in Toronto will joke about how a cloud passing overhead could push her off the call, but she knows many of them would give up their condo for her lakefront home, especially during the pandemic.

“We have this gorgeous home, gorgeous view that costs way less than their monthly rent, right?” says the 33-year-old.

“And especially since they can work remote now, I for sure think people will try to start spreading out from the bigger cities.”

She is excited to hear governments of all levels talking about improved internet service and is hoping those promises come true in the next few years. 

“I want to say, ‘hey it’s 2020.’ We should have at least decent, not asking for Five Op, but decent internet,” says Jacobs.

“We’re a First World country. We want to promote the north.”

Many northerners have gotten into the habit of checking the weather forecast and regularly testing their internet speed before planning out their day. (Erik White/CBC )

When Michael Blair and his wife and two kids moved to East Ferris nine years ago, they knew they’d be giving up some of their online lives.

“We were OK with not having as much internet. In a way it metered us, brought us out of our rooms and brought us together,” he says. 

“When it started to impact businesses, when it started to impact education, that changed things.”

That changed with the pandemic, when Blair’s country home south of North Bay became his office and his kids’ classroom.

He has now joined the East Ferris Internet Advocacy Group, lobbying for better service for the small town.

“It’s only going to become more important and I believe we can’t rely on the traditional funding models,” says Blair.

Michael Blair and his family tolerated slow internet in East Ferris for years, but the pandemic prompted him to join a group pushing for better service. (Tracy Fuller/CBC )

The Manitoulin Health Centre in Little Current is on fibre optic cable and has strong, fast service.

But the rest of the island does not and the virtual appointments that have become popular during the pandemic have been difficult to offer patients. 

Vice-president of corporate services Tim Vine says, without improved broadband infrastructure, large parts of northern Ontario will get left out of the health care system of tomorrow. 

“I think more and more it’s appropriate to think of access to internet service being provided to folks as something like a public utility,” he says. 

Jeff Buell’s job is identifiying the gaps in internet service in northern Ontario and trying to find ways to fill them.

Somedays, his own home is in that category.

Buell, his wife and four kids are sharing a shaky DSL line in Chisholm Township, south of North Bay, and after COVID-19 hit, he was forced to get a second cellular connection for his work at Blue Sky Net. 

Map showing how much of Greater Sudbury has 50/10 internet service, but how that fades away very quickly after you go into more rural areas of the northeast. (Blue Sky Net)

“I actually haven’t asked Susan, because I don’t want to know, but I suspect it’s around $300, $400,” he says with a laugh. 

“‘I’ve had to promise ‘I’m not streaming anything. It’s work!'”

Buell says about 70 per cent of northern Ontario has decent service, but almost all of them live in the five major cities.

And even then, speed tests show that in cities like Timmins or Sault Ste. Marie, it’s not always easy to get the CRTC national minimum standard of 50 megabits per second download and 10 megabits upload. 

Buell says right now he’s trying to figure out how much it would cost to run fibre optic cable at about $80 per metre to every home and business in the north. 

“Understanding that that’s not realistic and we’re going to have a number that’s so big we can’t comprehend,” he says.

Buell says then you could identify which areas would be tough to serve with fibre and look at other options, including fixed internet towers or low orbit satellites.

He says one big difference from other major infrastructure builds of the past is that the internet will constantly need upgrading.

“I don’t see that stopping. I mean what’s the next phase. Three-dimensional broadcasting and ultra high definition,” says Buell. 

“I think the sky’s the limit.”

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BEYOND LOCAL: Students should be encouraged to study humanities for the post-coronavirus world, prof says

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Australia’s move to increase fees for some university humanities courses reflects global trends towards market-friendly education that overlook what’s needed for human flourishing

This article, written by Alan Sears, University of New Brunswick and Penney Clark, University of British Columbia, originally appeared on The Conversation and has been republished here with permission:

Finally, someone has figured out how to put an end to students wasting their lives in the quixotic pursuit of knowledge associated with the humanities.

The government of Australia announced in June a reform package that would lower fees for what are considered “job-relevant” university courses while raising the cost of some humanities courses. Under the proposed changes, “a three-year humanities degree would more than double in cost.” English and language course fees, however, are among those being lowered.

These reforms are proposed as part of larger changes to post-secondary funding as Australian universities, like Canadian and other global universities, find themselves grappling with the seismic impacts of COVID-19.

They also reflect larger trends towards what’s considered market-friendly learning. Around the world, educational policy-makers have chipped away for years at the position of the humanities in school curricula at every level to make more room for the so-called STEM disciplines (science, technology, engineering and mathematics). The humanities is typically considered to include the arts, history, literature, philosophy and languages.

Educational reforms

The Australian reforms are intended to boost enrolment where the government says more “job-ready graduates” will be needed “in health care, teaching and STEM related fields, including engineering and IT.”

The cost changes apply per course, so that “by choosing electives that respond to employer needs … students can reduce the total cost of their study.” The proposed reforms aim to make it cheaper to undertake post-secondary studies in areas of expected job growth.

Such reform efforts are part of a larger global push aimed at establishing the STEM disciplines as central to public education.

In New Brunswick, this has been illustrated in a series of educational reforms emphasizing the centrality of economic priorities to shaping public education. These reforms promote a focus on literacy (not literature), numeracy and science. For example, the province’s 10-year education plan, published in 2016 speaks of reviewing “… high school course selections in the arts, trades and technology, with a view to revising, developing and clustering courses to address labour market and industry requirements.…”

The New Brunswick reforms, and many other such efforts, have largely excluded input from teachers, parents, students and local communities. They’ve focused on the standardization of education systems, while ignoring global lessons about how more holistic approaches to education often produce significant system-wide academic success.

The new Australian policy takes a market-oriented approach focused on using financial incentives to encourage certain choices. Australia is definitely ahead of the curve on this one. Or is it?

Economic goals in public education

No single organization has had more impact on the global move toward prioritizing economic goals in public education than the Organization of Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), through its Program for International Student Assessment (PISA).

PISA is an international testing program that has traditionally assessed student achievement in reading, mathematics and science in almost 100 countries and regions around the world. The results generate press and shape discussions and decisions about educational policy and practice in important ways.

One group of education scholars writes that “PISA has arguably become the most influential educational assessment today,” and emphasizes that the program was developed to assist the OECD with its economic mandate and that this rationale informed the assessment’s framework and continues to guide its development.

In recent times, growing social and cultural fragmentation have created challenges for the world’s economies and prompted a rethink even in the OECD of the kind of education necessary for a more comprehensive prosperity. In 2018 it moved the PISA program beyond the three traditional subject areas to begin assessing “global competence,” which it describes as “a multidimensional capacity.”

Learning for ‘global competence’

According to the OECD, “globally competent individuals can examine local, global and intercultural issues, understand and appreciate different perspectives and world views, interact successfully and respectfully with others, and take responsible action toward sustainability and collective well-being.”

The OECD believes “educating for global competence can boost employability,” and also believes that all subjects can introduce global competence.

It seems to us learning history and other humanities disciplines are effective ways to foster the elements of global competence outlined in their description.

In our recent book, The Arts and the Teaching of History, we make the case that sustained and systematic engagement with the humanities — including, history, literature and visual and commemorative art — is effective in fostering a number of positive humanistic and civic outcomes and competencies.

These include: complex comprehension of history and literature and the nature of truth; nuanced understanding of the relationships between history and collective memory and how those operate in the formation of individual and group identities; and, particularly important in contemporary Australia, Canada and elsewhere, engagement with Indigenous perspectives.

This is not to argue that the teaching of history, literature or other humanities subjects is without criticism. As they have appeared in school curriculum these subjects have often been overly focused on so-called western civilization. Marie Battiste, Mi’kmaw educator and professor in educational foundations at the University of Saskatchewan, in her book Visioning a Mi’kmaw Humanities: Indigenizing the Academy explores reframing the humanities to create:

“ … a vision of society and education where knowledge systems and languages are reinforced, not diluted, where they can respectfully gather together without resembling each other, and where peoples can participate in the cultural life of a society, education and their community.”

Appreciating different worldviews

Does anyone really believe that in the midst of vigorous public debates about what it means to build a just society, the world needs more people without the educational background to understand where their societies came from and how they developed? In the age of Black Lives Matter, rising Indigenous activism and substantial public engagement we need to educate people to take responsible action toward collective well-being.

Of course, STEM subjects are critical in fostering understanding of issues related to sustainability and collective well-being. They are a necessary, but only a partial, aspect of any child’s education. The humanities play an essential role in aspects of global competence which have not been the focus of the STEM subjects.

If the study of history, society, culture or the arts dies, our societies may learn the hard way that it takes more than narrow job preparation to ensure that our students will flourish as human beings. Such flourishing includes willingness and ability to engage with the challenging and urgent social, cultural, environmental and political issues with which they are confronted in these times.The Conversation

Alan Sears, Honorary Research Professor, Faculty of Education, University of New Brunswick and Penney Clark, Professor, Social Studies Education, University of British Columbia

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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How conspiracies like QAnon are slowly creeping into some Canadian churches

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Pastor John van Sloten of Marda Loop Church in Calgary had been thinking about, in his view, the theology behind wearing a mask. 

His basic premise was that if Jesus, who was God, took on a human body to mask his Godness for the sake of others, then Christians too should cover up their faces with a mask amid the pandemic.

So, he penned a column for a local newspaper and made it the subject of one of his sermons.

“I thought it was a pretty convincing theological argument,” van Sloten says. “But people just went nuts with it.”

Soon, the Facebook page for Marda Loop Church was flooded with angry commenters. One told van Sloten that he couldn’t possibly be a pastor with such beliefs. Another said he should be ashamed for “posting such nonsense.”

One commenter even posted a meme of Jesus displaying his middle finger to the reader.

“I thought that was creative,” van Sloten said. “A lot of it was repeating of the conspiracy theories that the whole masking thing is made up, that you’re drinking the Kool-Aid like the rest of liberal society.”

Comments flooded the Facebook page for Marda Loop Church in Calgary after Pastor John van Sloten wrote a column and preached a sermon on the theology behind wearing a mask. (Facebook)

Van Sloten said he’s received criticism, hate mail and even protests outside his church over the years, and has mostly ignored those instances that seemed like trolling.

But he said he’s also read about the advent of the baseless conspiracy theory QAnon in American churches — and feels that churches in Canada should be carefully tracking its possible journey north.

“The Christian church has always been exposed to heresies and incorrect thinking historically from the get-go,” van Sloten said. “Heresies come and heresies go, and this is the heresy du jour. And I think we ought to treat it like that.”

An American conspiracy comes north

The QAnon conspiracy theory originated in 2017 on the imageboard 4chan after a user identified as “Q” claimed they had insider information on the administration of U.S. President Donald Trump.

Through a series of anonymous posts, Q propagated the conspiracy that Trump was battling against a child-trafficking ring that included “deep state” government officials, prominent Democrats and members of Hollywood.

Followers of the QAnon conspiracy theory include members from both secular and religious groups, and aren’t made up specifically of those people who participate in the Christian faith.

And though QAnon may have begun as a distinctly American conspiracy, its tentacles have since been attached to governments and notable individuals around the world.

“Prime Minister [Justin Trudeau] has been mentioned in Q drops since the start of QAnon,” said Marc-André Argentino, a PhD candidate at Concordia University who studies QAnon. “We have some significant influencers [based in Canada].

“Amazing Polly [a QAnon influencer based in Ontario] was at the root of the Wayfair conspiracy theory. It’s not like Canada is just taking the American aspect, but they’re adapting it to its own context.”

Typical QAnon conspiracies connected to Canada involve the belief that Trudeau is one of the “deep state elites” who need to be removed from office to “awaken and liberate” the country.

Marc-André Argentino, a PhD candidate at Concordia University in Montreal, says QAnon offers believers a symbolic resource that helps people explain why bad things are happening in the world. (Ted S. Warren, File/The Associated Press)

Growth among QAnon adherents within secular and religious communities is steady, and underpinned by different motivations, Argentino said.

But he said he expected there could be an easy path for the religious community to understand apocalyptic language in the political context, making it potentially easier for members to accept QAnon.

“[Religions and conspiracy theories] have this function where they permit the development of symbolic resources that enable people to define and address the problem of evil,” he said. “So whether you want to know why something is happening, whether you’re blessed or cursed — God or the devil — it’s the same thing with QAnon.

“This conspiracy theory is providing a mainstream narrative for things like a pandemic, or war, or child trafficking … It’s just a natural pathway for a lot of evangelicals in the U.S., especially considering how evangelicalism is closely linked to American politics.”

‘How could you believe this?’

When the pandemic started, Jessica DiSabatino, lead pastor at Calgary’s Journey Church, felt confident in keeping to one of her church’s “high values” — that not all members shared the same views, and that was OK.

But as lockdown dragged on and the church lost its face-to-face contact, she noticed some things that worried her. 

On social media, DiSabatino watched as the debunked Plandemic video was retweeted and watched hundreds of times by people in her congregation.

Inevitably, DiSabatino began hearing of QAnon from people around her, and began to read more about it. 

“There is like a religious fervour about it,” she said. “The more I read about it, it seems like a replacement religion, where everything has a reason.

“And I think people want to feel like they’re on the inner workings of something, particularly when we don’t have a lot of power.”

Jessica DiSabatino, lead pastor at Calgary’s Journey Church, says she feels she needs to confront conspiracy theories when they arise in her congregation, while still respecting those who believe them. (Submitted by Jessica DiSabatino/Google Maps)

Seeing posts emerge on social media about QAnon from her congregation, DiSabatino soon felt herself struck by a new feeling — was this going to cause fractures within her church community? Was all the work she had done being undone by this conspiracy?

DiSabatino could even feel herself getting angry. As friends in her life began voicing their openness to QAnon, she thought to herself — “How could you believe this? What is wrong with you?”

“These are some of my friends who I love. And what I’ve had to say to them, in the end, is this cannot define our friendship,” she said.

Looking for ‘the big story’

DiSabatino soon realized her own anger toward what she viewed as someone’s irrational beliefs would drive a further wedge between them — and didn’t begin to uncover what might be motivating those beliefs.

“I don’t think I can say nothing,” she said. “But I also think it’s a very personal thing — so I’m not going to get up and preach a message about why I think QAnon is crazy.

“Partly, because I think different people come to conspiracy theories for different reasons. I think sometimes you’ve got hurt that is unimaginable in your life.”

People of faith are [looking] for a big story that explains why things are the way they are.– John van Sloten, pastor of Marda Loop Church in Calgary

Van Sloten said conspiracy theories and church can often fill the same void, because they’re trading on the same faith and desire for an authoritative voice — something exacerbated in a time rife with turmoil and anxiety.

“People of faith are also looking for a big story that explains why things are the way they are,” he said. “So again, these desires — these good desires, in all of us, I believe, as a theologian — they’re ultimately meant to be directed to a grand narrator who can be trusted, who is authoritative.

“They’re being co-opted by conspiracy theories, by people who want control by making cognitive shortcuts and just getting an answer because they’ve got to get an answer soon.”

Conspiracists functioning almost as prophets

Colin Toffelmire, associate professor of Old Testament at Ambrose University College in Calgary, says there has been a historical vulnerability to conspiracy thinking in some versions of evangelicalism or fundamentalist Christianity.

“I think that’s related to the history of how some Christians in North America have thought about history and science, especially,” Toffelmire said.

“For example, there’s this long-standing objection in evangelical subculture to really well-accepted scientific theories, like the theory of evolution by natural selection.”

There has been a long-standing objection in evangelical subculture to some well-accepted scientific theories, like Charles Darwin’s theory of evolution by natural selection, said Colin Toffelmire, associate professor of Old Testament at Ambrose University College in Calgary. (Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Those objections — centred in versions of Christianity that believe that everything in the Bible is exactly historically and scientifically accurate — could make certain individuals suspicious of mainstream ideas in science and history, Toffelmire said.

“Some of that is kind of hard-baked into some versions of North American evangelical subculture,” he said. “And so that is, I think, almost like an entry point. That suspicion of authority becomes an entry point for very strange conspiracy theories, like the QAnon conspiracy theory.”

Joel Thiessen, professor of sociology at Ambrose, said though churches should be aware of the rise of QAnon, he wasn’t sure that it was yet a prominent concern in Canada.

But taking an example from the United States, he said it appears that more conservative Christian groups tend to gravitate toward conspiracy, potentially because they may feel they are becoming marginalized in secular society.

“[They feel] they are losing positions of power that conservative religious groups have historically had, particularly in the U.S., to a lesser extent in Canada,” Thiessen said.

“There’s an emerging sense among some conservative groups that they have lost power in governments, in education, in media and so forth.”

Joel Thiessen, a professor of sociology at Ambrose University College, says there has been a perception among conservative religious groups over the last half-century that the media has moved in a more secular or progressive direction. (Submitted by Joel Thiessen)

Thiessen said that those in conservative religious groups who gravitate toward conspiracy still represent a small minority of churchgoers. 

But those who end up believing the conspiracy, Thiessen said, may typically be drawn to it for much of the same reasons others in society are. 

“You have potentially charismatic or polarizing figures, who almost function like prophets within these sub-narratives within society,” Thiessen said. “I think because of physically distanced communities and congregations not gathering together as frequently, people are perhaps not even watching their own online religious services. That means they aren’t being socialized.

“It actually makes this a rife time for such groups to actually capitalize on those opportunities. No doubt we’re seeing those things unfold before our very eyes.”

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