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Annual Fourth Of July Celebration In Mayville Canceled | News, Sports, Jobs

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The Chautauqua County Fourth of July celebration in Mayville, including the annual parade and festival, have been canceled.

In a news release, the committee that oversees the festivities said:

“It is with heavy hearts that we have to cancel the July 4 parade and festivities at Mayville Lakeside Park this year. It was a very tough decision for the committee to make but we feel it is the right decision to make at this time.

“The committee is, however, still trying to have fireworks. We are working in conjunction with the village of Mayville, the town of Chautauqua, and Skylighters to develop and plan a display that is safe for spectators in regards to both fire safety and social distancing.

“More details will be announced when they become available.”

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Walsh Administration Launches Initiative To Help Residents With Criminal Records Access Jobs, Housing

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Boston Mayor Marty Walsh is launching a new initiative called Project Opportunity, which aims to help residents seal or expunge their criminal records and help them get better access to jobs and housing. WGBH Morning Edition host Joe Mathieu spoke with Rufus Faulk, director of Boston’s Office of Public Safety, about the new program. The transcript has been edited for clarity.

Joe Mathieu: You were director of victim services at the Mass Department of Corrections earlier in your career, so you have pretty unique insight into how difficult it is to manage life with criminal charges or to reintegrate into society after being incarcerated. How would this program help?

Rufus Faulk: So the goal of this program is to make sure that we connect residents with free legal consultation to determine if their CORI’s even eligible for sealing or expungement. We cover the filing costs for that. But I think one of the main features of this program is our ability to, once folks have their records viewed, then try to connect them to employment and other social service opportunities. We’re just trying to assure that every resident in the city of Boston has an opportunity to prosper and recognize that those with CORI often have trouble doing so.

Mathieu: And when you say “CORI,” we’re referring to criminal charges in general, right?

Faulk: Yes, absolutely.

Mathieu: Are you working with the private sector [and] local industry to help place these individuals into jobs?

Faulk: So that’s one of the main features of this. We are making sure that we connect to the local and regional economy to try to see which industries are the ones that are most open for growth, and what we found is those tech spaces, those spaces around hospitality [and] in those building trades. We’ve had experience with this with a program called Operation Exit, which features some of the same population, giving them training around the building trades and then trying to usher them into that field, so we’re trying to expand upon that into other industries that are open for growth for folks who have CORI records.

Mathieu: We did some exclusive reporting about Operation Exit here at WGBH News, and I was lucky enough to attend one of the graduation ceremonies. It’s been a wild success from all metrics in terms of placing people who come from disadvantaged backgrounds into new careers, essentially. The numbers are relatively small, though, right? How will you start in terms of some of the class sizes, if you will, in helping individuals make that move?

Faulk: So as of right now, we’ve had 65 registrants. We’re trying to be very broad in terms of our external partners — both internal in terms of our city departments, but also externally working with other entities and departments who deal with that similar population. So we’re trying to cast a wide net. It’s simple registration. You go to owd.boston.gov/projectopportunity, and that gets the process started. We have a great partnership with Lawyers Clearinghouse and that’s our legal partner who [is] supplying the volunteer lawyers to meet with residents and to thoroughly review their CORI options. So we’re trying to be as inclusive and expansive as possible, trying to turn over every stone in terms of industry, but also make sure we’re pulling in all of our partners, whether it be the Suffolk County DA’s office, whether it be entities like our local courthouses and entities like STRIVE Boston — just trying to make sure that we are inclusive and expansive so that everyone recognizes that this is a free opportunity for them.

Mathieu: Director Faulk, that brings us to the greater conversation happening here in Boston and all over the country: how to break systemic racism. The fact is, criminal records disproportionately impact people of color.

Faulk: Absolutely, so we recognize that some of the unintended consequences of policy has been really just overpolicing and over criminalization of Black and brown communities, largely stemming from the war on drugs, where a lot of folks who were dealing with addiction were then criminalized. That created a massive population of folks who have these CORI records. And recognizing that in this time that we’re living in, we’re looking at, How do we have a real public health approach to closing some of these gaps? And that’s what we recognize in our Project Opportunity. Mayor Walsh has made the idea around second chances not only foundational in his life, it’s been foundational in his tenure as mayor. So this program is just a continuation of that.

Mathieu: Another story about second chances. There are efforts underway to dismantle systemic racism in city government. The mayor recently appointed a chief equity officer. The City Council is taking its own path. But I wonder, Director Faulk, as a man of color who works inside this very system, what are your thoughts on this? How much work does Boston need to do?

Faulk: I’m someone who was born and raised in Roxbury. I’m 38 years old. I’ve been very fortunate in my life that I don’t have a CORI. Well, I actually do have a CORI; I had a trespassing charge when I was 14. But I also had friends who were 16 [and] 17 who were caught with a bag of weed, and that one bag of weed really derailed their entire lives.

So I recognize what the landscape has been in the city of Boston and how so many of us could get caught up in the system so easily. Boston has a long history of issues around racism that impact Black and brown communities, but I think the first step is for us to acknowledge them, and then the second step is make sure that we’re listening to the community to fully address them.

And Project Opportunity is continuing our goal in trying to address the systemic racism and recognizing that the only way we will be able to undo some of the past missteps is to be able to be really at the forefront around policies. This is our attempt to do [something for] those impacted by CORI and impacted by criminal record. So we’re just trying to continue that process [and] recognize that we have a lot of work to do.

But I think Boston can be a leader, especially in this time. We are in a unique times. This is historic times around making sure Black life is valued in policy, and I think we are on the path. And I feel good about being an administrator and being able to lead such an effort.



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Strike | News, Sports, Jobs

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Members of Operating Engineers Local 324 picket in front of Road Machinery & Supplies Co. in Negaunee on Monday. Twelve employees, who work in the service department of RMS as mechanics, have been in negotiations with the distributor of construction and mining equipment for nearly a year. (Journal photo by Lisa Bowers)

NEGAUNEE — Motorists traveling on U.S. 41 between Marquette and Negaunee may notice a group of picketers outside Road Machinery & Supplies Co. in Negaunee.

Members of Operating Engineers Local 324 are striking for a fair contract, union spokesman Matt Bourdage said.

Twelve union members, who are employed as mechanics in the service department at RMS, have been in negotiations with the local distributor of construction and mining equipment for over 10 months, he said.

“We are on strike until we get a contract,” Bourdage said. “We have been in pretty tough contract negotiations for, well, Aug. 1 will be a year now. So we have been working for almost a year without a contact and we want a contract with a fair retirement before we come back to work.”

When contacted on Monday afternoon, RMS officials declined to comment on the matter.

Members of the union will picket the business until a contract can be negotiated, Bourdage said.

“If members of any other union want to stand in solidarity with us and fight this fight, they are more than welcome,” he said.

According to its website, Operating Engineers 324 represents 14,000 individuals across Michigan who are employed in the construction trades as heavy equipment operators. The union’s members also include those involved in commercial and public building maintenance, bus drivers, hospital staff and hospitality workers.

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Marie Elena (Patri) Keller | News, Sports, Jobs

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Marie Elena (Patri) Keller, 90, of Jersey Shore, passed away Friday, July 10, 2020, at Manor Care, Jersey Shore.

Marie was born on March 19, 1930 in Brooklyn, N.Y. She had worked for 25 years at Jersey Shore Hospital and retired in 1985.

She loved to share stories of a happy childhood in Jersey City, N.J.; memories with sister, Annette, and best friends, Gloria and Helen. She beamed with pride when recalling her first job as a receptionist on Wall Street and with glee when telling how she found love in Pine Creek native, H. Philip Keller, whom she married on June 26, 1948. She would move to join him in Jersey Shore, where she would raise their daughters, Sherry and Lynn, and son, Matthew; become a fixture at Grace Lutheran Church; gather with many friends. Early in their marriage, Marie and Phil would host New Year’s Eve parties for the neighborhood and later, for their growing family, she would plan Sunday dinners, summer picnics on Pine Creek and card nights. There was always dessert. Through these traditions, Marie will continue to be alive–felt, heard–in the everydays of her ever-growing family.

Marie was a fantastic seamstress, enjoyed motor homing, spending time at their lot in Ramsey, overlooking Pine Creek and was the best cook in the world; not just by her family but by anyone who had her food.

She was a rock; the strongest, funniest, sweetest person in any room. No one laughed or loved with more ease than Marie Keller and we are forever grateful that she was ours, forever proud of the parts of her that we see in ourselves. She has gone now to rest, reunited with her loving God and her best friend, Phil.

Marie is survived by her daughters, Sherry Mantle and Lynn Keller-Landon, and her son, Matthew Keller; her grandsons, Stephen and Jeremy Kanski, Garrett Mantle, and Aaron Landon; and her granddaughter, Hannah Landon; as well as 11 great-grandchildren. This happy life of hers was met also with the sadness of parting, having mourned the passing of her grandson, Philip Kanski; Annette, Gloria and Helen, three Mitzis; and her beloved husband of nearly 70 years.

There will be a public viewing 6 to 8 p.m. Thursday, July 16, at Rearick-Carpenter Funeral Home, 1002 Allegheny St., Jersey Shore, and again 10 to 11 a.m. Friday, July 17, at the funeral home where the funeral service will begin at 11 a.m. Pastor Stephen P. Kanski will officiate. Burial will follow in Jersey Shore Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association.

Marie’s family kindly requests that attendees wear a face covering.

Send condolences at www.rearick-carpenter.com




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